3dm test ramp

Starting Line (Ramp)

Moderators: Jani Soderhall, Henry Hester

Post Reply
Howard Gordon
1953-2010 (RIP)
1953-2010 (RIP)
Posts: 141
Joined: Thu Aug 22, 2002 2:00 am
Location: San Luis Obispo
Contact:

Post by Howard Gordon » Tue Jul 08, 2003 5:03 am

<img src="http://www.3dm-sport.com/images/3dm-tra ... 0.jpg"><br>
We just completed our first attempt at a start ramp. Just under 4 ft tall, 3 ft wide, 4 ft deep platform. Probably used $150 in materials, but did not keep track of the time. It's somewhat heavier than the Airflow ramps, but similar in construction.

Guest

Post by Guest » Tue Jul 08, 2003 5:13 am

What do you think of the difference between the rolled transition (FCR ramps) and the angled one. I see it more of an issue off of the platform...

nice ramp though. We need on here in the east coast!

Howard Gordon
1953-2010 (RIP)
1953-2010 (RIP)
Posts: 141
Joined: Thu Aug 22, 2002 2:00 am
Location: San Luis Obispo
Contact:

Post by Howard Gordon » Tue Jul 08, 2003 6:02 am

Hard to say. We do have a modest roll-in at the top, and the bottom transition is similar to FCR, but otherwise straight. This ramp is a fair bit taller and steeper than FCR, but it's not particularly scary. The FCR "s" transition does provide perhaps a bit better platform for a launching pump toward the bottom.

I'll bet there are craftsmen in your part of the world who are far more competent in building something like this. All I had was a photo and a vague recollection of how other ramps were constructed, and this came out okay.

Jani Soderhall
ISSA President 2011-2020
ISSA President 2011-2020
Posts: 4175
Joined: Thu Aug 22, 2002 2:00 am
Location: Sweden, lives in France
Contact:

Post by Jani Soderhall » Tue Jul 08, 2003 12:15 pm

I like both straight and S-shaped ramps. I'm not sure it really makes a difference. But it is important to have a good transition at the bottom for the straight ramps, so that you don't hit the bottom at too much of an angle. I'm sure the S-shaped ramps accomplish this task better.

At the top the main thing is not to make the slope too steep as longer boards may scratch the edge going down. Once again, S-shaped ramps may be better at that.

The most important factor for all ramps in my opinion is to stay put. Ie when you pull away, the ramp mustn't move. This can be accomplished by making an overall heavy ramp, but the easiest way to do it is probably to make a long enough platform up on the top.

I'm a bit surprised that the rear legs are not connected in any way to the other legs. If they would be connected, even with a very weak piece, they'd hold together better if you need to move or slide the ramp a few feet.

I critisized the ramps in the tunnel race which were too light, but the once in Gruningen were OK, so Chris Hart probably made little improvements in the construction to make them more stable.

For racing it's good to have a few steps behind the ramp, to get up easier. It speeds up the "getting ready" phase during practice and while racing.

Chris Eggers
Germany
Germany
Posts: 504
Joined: Mon Sep 09, 2002 2:00 am
Location: Germany
Contact:

Post by Chris Eggers » Tue Jul 08, 2003 12:40 pm

I think the curved transitions are better because you can really get a "pump" while rolling down. The angled transitions make that harder. It may be an advantage for transition oriented skaters, but on the other hand everyone can learn that.

The FCR ramps were too low in my opinion (for Morro, not for Avila)

Howard Gordon
1953-2010 (RIP)
1953-2010 (RIP)
Posts: 141
Joined: Thu Aug 22, 2002 2:00 am
Location: San Luis Obispo
Contact:

Post by Howard Gordon » Tue Jul 08, 2003 3:39 pm

Here's a side view showing the transition and side bracing ...

<img src="http://www.3dm-sport.com/images/ramp300.jpg">

Karl Floitgraf
Slalomspot.com
Slalomspot.com
Posts: 584
Joined: Wed Jun 18, 2003 2:00 am
Location: North America
Contact:

Post by Karl Floitgraf » Tue Jul 08, 2003 3:45 pm

What matierial did you use for the top layer that you roll on?
BOSTON BAKED BEAN
HONORARY TEXAS OUTLAW

Howard Gordon
1953-2010 (RIP)
1953-2010 (RIP)
Posts: 141
Joined: Thu Aug 22, 2002 2:00 am
Location: San Luis Obispo
Contact:

Post by Howard Gordon » Tue Jul 08, 2003 3:52 pm

There is a bottom layer of 1/4" plywood with 2 x 1/8" layers of masonite (same as wood half-pipes) on top. I had trouble bending the plywood, so in the future, I would just use more layers of masonite. Underneath, there are 4 2x4's spaced 2-ft apart as support.

Guest

Post by Guest » Tue Jul 08, 2003 4:20 pm

I am sure we have craftsmen in this part of the world that could build starting ramps. The thing is is that no one has a place to build/store it and then no one can schlep the thing around.

nice ramp though!

I prefer the gate free design over the FCR style gate. I'd rather have a wand start like ski racing anyway.

Ricky Byrd
ByrdDog
ByrdDog
Posts: 227
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2002 2:00 am
Location: Madison, Mississippi

Post by Ricky Byrd » Fri Jul 11, 2003 3:58 pm

Nice ramp Howard. Looks like it would be lighter than my design but there is something to be said for the extra weight. That was the reason for the two piece design along with making it fit in the back of an F-150. I would imagine yours sits better on a less than perfect surface. Mine tends to rock a bit and require shimming. If I do it again I would like to add screw type adjustable "feet" on the bottom.

Wesley Tucker
1961-2013 (RIP)
1961-2013 (RIP)
Posts: 3279
Joined: Tue Aug 27, 2002 2:00 am

Post by Wesley Tucker » Fri Jul 11, 2003 4:19 pm

Ricky,

Do you have pictures of yours other than race day stuff? I don't think I've ever seen a good photo of your construction other than from a distance as in when a race is starting or some such thing.

I know: "Wes, why don't you just come to Mississippi for a race and see it for yourself?" Hey, I'm workin' on it! The only thing keeping me from heading to Jackson is time, money, skill and more money. :razz:

Post Reply